Posts Tagged csharp

Class Set as DataContext in XAML without Code Behind

In dealing with a problem at work and I am probably as guilty as anyone of relying on code behind to do basic functions without soley using XAML. Why? Because that’s the way I have always done it. But it’s a new day and time to learn new ways to do things. So here we go….

This example shows a class set as datacontext – the code behind file is completely empty.

Have a great week….

 

<Window x:Class=”cSharpTest.MainWindow”
        xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation”
        xmlns:x=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml”
        xmlns:vm=”clr-namespace:cSharpTest”
        Title=”MainWindow” Height=”350″ Width=”525″>
    <Window.Resources>
        <vm:MyData x:Key=”ViewModel”/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext=”{StaticResource ViewModel}”>
        <ListBox Name=”MyListBox” ItemsSource=”{Binding Primes}”/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace cSharpTest
{
    class MyData
    {
        public MyData()
        {
            _primes = new int[5] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 11 };
        }
        private int[] _primes;
        public  int[] Primes
        {
            get { return this._primes; }
         }
    }
}

Advertisements

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

C# Application linked to SharePoint List Web Service

This weekend found myself knee deep in a crisis that my friend who had migrated from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 (there were reasons he couldn’t go to 2010). Simply put the migration from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 had broken his application (tracking program that submitted data to a 2003 SharePoint List) because in SharePoint 2007  you can’t do this while not on the actual server if you have “Web Page Security Validation” enabled. So for the code below you have to have SPWeb.AllowUnsafeUpdates = true; . Obviously not the ideal solution for my friend but we didn’t have time to screw around. Here is what I did….

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Collections;
using System.Xml;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Net;
 
namespace Trigger_Tracker
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {//form move on click and drag
        bool FormMoving;
        Point initialPoint;
        TriggerTrackerPictureBox frmPicture;
 
        public Form1()
        {//form move on click and drag
            InitializeComponent();
            comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0;
            FormMoving = false;
 
            frmPicture = new TriggerTrackerPictureBox();
            frmPicture.localForm = this;
            frmPicture.Owner = this;
            frmPicture.Show();
            frmPicture.Width = 68;
            frmPicture.Height = 65;
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        private void SetPositionOfPictureForm()
        {
            frmPicture.Top = this.Top + 26;
            frmPicture.Left = this.Left + 87;
        }
 
       
 
        private void TrackerButton(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string listGUID = “A93E1A7E-67D0-4D7D-A4ED-803D7DFE684B”;
            string viewGUID = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
            //string viewGUID2 = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
 
            int ItemCounter = 1;
            ServiceList.Lists listService = new ServiceList.Lists();
           // RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient listService = new RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient();
 
            //////
           listService.Credentials = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
           //listService.ChannelFactory.Credentials.Windows.ClientCredential   = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
 
            XmlNode activeItemData = listService.GetListItems(listGUID, viewGUID, null, null, “100”, null);
            XmlDocument xDoc = new XmlDocument();
            string tmpString = activeItemData.InnerXml.Replace(“\r\r”, “”);
            xDoc.LoadXml(tmpString);
            XmlNamespaceManager nsManager = new XmlNamespaceManager(xDoc.NameTable);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“z”, “#RowsetSchema”);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“rs”, “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:rowset”);
 
            XmlNodeList xNode = xDoc.SelectNodes(“/rs:data/z:row”, nsManager);
 
            foreach (XmlNode tmpNode in xNode)
                ItemCounter++;
 
            StringBuilder strBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            strBuilder.Append(“<Method ID='” + ItemCounter + “‘ Cmd=’New’>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Attachments’>” + “0” + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Title’>” + PolicyNumber.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Reason’>” + comboBox1.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“</Method>”);
 
            string strBatch = strBuilder.ToString();
 
            XmlDocument newDoc = new XmlDocument();
            XmlElement newElement = newDoc.CreateElement(“Batch”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“OnError”, “Continue”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“ViewName”, viewGUID);
            newElement.InnerXml = strBatch;
           
            XmlNode returnNode = listService.UpdateListItems(listGUID, newElement);
 
            this.comboBox1.Text = “Please Select….”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Text = “”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Mask = “0000000000”;
 
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
 
       
 
 
        public void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            if (FormMoving)
            {
                if ((Left + e.X – initialPoint.X) <= 0)
                    Left = 0;
                else if ((Right + e.X – initialPoint.X) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right)
                    Left = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right – Width;
                else
                    Left = Left + e.X – initialPoint.X;
                if ((Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) <= 0)
                    Top = 0;
                else if ((Bottom + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom)
                    Top = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom – Height;
                else
                    Top = Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y;
            }
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
       
 
        public void Form1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if(!PolicyNumber.Focused)
                this.Opacity = .25;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseHover_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
    }
}

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Databind ComboBox with WPF and C#

Its been a while my apologies. I have been extremely busy.

This topic came up because in existing applications data binding at design time was heavily used. I personally avoid such data binding as much as possible because well in all honesty it causes me a lot of problems later on. I realize many of you live and die with it. So don’t take it personally.

So I am converting one of these apps to XAML and WPF. They insisted I maintain a ComboBox databind. As many of you know data binding has changed a bit in WPF from your standard application. I created a property to bind the ComboBox to. I set the DataContext of the page to itself, which I like to do. It lets me expose various properties and quickly bind to them. Have a great weekend!

XAML
—-
        <ComboBox
            Height=”23″
            HorizontalAlignment=”Left”
            Margin=”10,10,0,0″
            Name=”comboBox1″
            VerticalAlignment=”Top”
            Width=”120″
            ItemsSource=”{Binding MyDataColumns}”
            DisplayMemberPath=”ColumnName”
            />
 
CODE BEHIND
—-
 
public partial class Window1 : Window
{
    public Window1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        LoadData();
        DataContext = this;
    }
 
    private DataTable _dataTable = null;
 
    private void LoadData()
    {
        SqlConnection cn = null;
        SqlCommand cmd = null;
        SqlDataAdapter adapter = null;
        DataSet dataSet = null;
 
        try
        {
            cn = new SqlConnection(“Data Source=MyMachine;Initial Catalog=MyDb;Integrated Security=True”);
            cmd = new SqlCommand(“select top 1 * from MyTable”, cn);
            adapter = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd);
            dataSet = new DataSet();
 
            adapter.Fill(dataSet);
 
            _dataTable = dataSet.Tables[0];
        }
        finally
        {
            if (cmd != null)
                cmd.Dispose();
 
            if (adapter != null)
                adapter.Dispose();
 
            if (dataSet != null)
                dataSet.Dispose();
 
            if (cn != null)
                cn.Dispose();
        }           
    }
 
    public IEnumerable MyDataColumns
    {
        get
        {
            return (IEnumerable)_dataTable.Columns;
        }
    }
}

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Convert Visio Pages to Images in vb.net

I have been fooling around with Visio automation since attempting to help a friend with a project that did so. In the course of this I did this code snippet to convert the Visio page to an image. The code loops through and takes each page and converts it to an image. Pretty basic. I have not posted in a while and my apologies to those of you who were wondering…. Smile

Here is the code….

Sub SaveAsImage()
‘ creates an invisible Visio instance, opens a document, then
‘ saves all pages in the document as jpg images using
‘ page name and page number as file name
 
    Dim vsoApp As Visio.Application
    Dim vsoDoc As Visio.Document
    Dim PathName As String, jpgName As String
    Dim pg As Visio.Page
  
    Set vsoApp = CreateObject(“Visio.InvisibleApp”)
    ‘ SET PATH/FILENAME BELOW TO VSD ON YOUR SYSTEM
    Set vsoDoc = vsoApp.Documents.Open(“c:\TEST\test.vsd”)
  
    PathName = vsoApp.Documents(1).Path      ‘ Set pathname to that of first document
           
    For Each pg In vsoApp.ActiveDocument.Pages
        jpgName = PathName & Format(pg.Index, “0#”) & ” ” & pg.Name & “.jpg”
        pg.Export jpgName
    Next
   
    vsoDoc.Close
    vsoApp.Quit
    Set vsoDoc = Nothing
    Set vsoApp = Nothing
 
End Sub

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

Fluent C# Review : Chapter Three

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on chapter three. Chapter three picks up where chapter two left off  in describing the Visual Studio environment. It does an excellent job of reviewing the more intricate details of Visual Studio. Again, it ignores winforms and focuses on the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) forms and design editor. Encouraging the reader to customize the interface for themselves, it shows how to do that. I certainly have not seen that done before so early on in the process and in such an easygoing manner. It ends the first section explaining what Intellisense is. Later on in this chapter it goes into how members are listed. An excellent tutorial on refactoring and such is also discussed. It’s possible this discussion could have waited a bit until later on but it still works here.

We then move on to cover what a Visual Studio solution and project is and what it contains including a very helpful diagram, as they seem to always do in this book, explaining what the relationship between the various items in a Visual Studio solution and project are.

image

The next section introduces designer and source files, resources and your design documents. Covering how to add items to a solution or project comes next along with a graphical and step by step process of how to modify project properties. Changing the icon and window property is one such example they cover. Then we build the application to see the results of the changes.

Further customization of the Visual Studio environment is then discussed in the usual graphical and step by step nature this book is so good at.

image

Overall I wish I had had a book like this when I first started using Visual Studio so many eons ago!

The next chapter gets into debugging and deploying an application. Moving right along the user shouldn’t be overwhelmed with this patient, easy going manner of teaching.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Fluent C# Review : Chapter One

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on Chapter One. Chapter One opens with an introduction to what application development is. It takes the reader through the simple problem of a messy paper stack and through a picture flow chart attempts to show the reader how the problem is to be solved and equate it with the same process of writing a windows application. It is unlike anything you have ever seen in a development book! But it is also one of the most clear renderings of the application process that I have seen.

image

They introduce you to the “clients” that are to appear throughout the book, two cooks named Neil and Gordon. (Incidentally the editor happens to be named Neil….coincidence? I think not!). It encourages you to take breaks at certain strategic points throughout the book as well. Neil and Gordon hand out their requirements and Riordan helps you get through it. She even begins the process of explaining the Agile software development methodology. It then introduces UML (Unified Modeling Language) and why it should be used. That and Agile are actually advanced topics perhaps left to a later time but I get why they do it here.

In the first project the book attempts to take you down the path of creating your requirements but before you see a single line of code you see the requirements explained in an easy to understand real life example. Then before you know it you have been introduced to database schemas, class diagrams and screen layout concepts all really done in a beautifully illustrated way. Extremely well done!

When there are words that need to be defined they are set out like so, so that they stand out from the rest of the page (see example below). Again hard to miss and it really catches the eye.

image

It goes into JIT (Just in Time Debugging) and the CLR (common language runtime) explaining what it is and how it is used. Of course at the end there is the obligatory review of the chapter. The only difference is this one is beautifully illustrated.

I don’t know about you but I am certainly looking forward to chapter two as we get more into the nuts and bolts of what is happening.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Fluent C# Review: The Intro

I have received an advanced copy of  the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan. Since this blog is often about what I am doing, I am going to give you all an inside look at what I feel is the most innovative and groundbreaking method of teaching programing skills that I have seen come along in quite some time. I intend to go chapter by chapter reviewing the concepts of what the book is teaching.

The first thing that grabs you is the cover of the book. It is not your typical programming book cover. It is….almost artsy and fun.

51arXWhGmiL__SL500_AA300_

No computer like lettering or images of how powerful you can become. It makes you want to smile. At first I didn’t like it at all. It doesn’t look feel or look like what a “computer book” should to me or at least what I would expect. As the book began I was stunned. I have never seen a computer programming book look like so!

image

The images really just jump off the page at you and grab your attention. I am used to a text learning process. So this was going to be something new. But as I progressed to the end of this chapter I really began to feel like this might be a new way to learn.

I had the opportunity to ask a few questions of the author of Fluent C#. She said that Fluent C# was “an introduction development in the C# language with .NET and WPF, aimed at beginning programmers” and that Fluent C# was different than other C# tutorials because of

“1) learn the way your brain learns, by trial & error rather than lecture and dictation
2) heavy use of graphics appeals to all the senses, making it easier to remember
3) concepts first, details later, just the way the brain works”

All in all I think I am going to find this book an interesting read and definitely a new way to learn. I am very much looking forward to it.

Facebook

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment