Posts Tagged example

Class to Simplify and Minimize Code for Stored Procedures and TSQL

First of all if you are using TSQL in your code you really need to get in a another line of work. It isn’t scalable, difficult to maintain and is generally a bad practice. But I know some of you still do it so I did include it. This class will allow you to in a few lines of code do your select, update, insert or delete statements in a very few lines of code. All that is required of the developer is to list the values in order (if you are using stored procedures) that are required. Also included is how to declare a new instance of a sqlparametercollection – which you aren’t suppose to be able to do. I ended up not needing it but included it just in case someone needs to do that someday. Also if you are using a strongly typed dataset there is a method included of how to do that. After the code is example of usage. Have a great day!

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data;

using System.IO;

using System.Data.SqlClient;

public class clsData
{

    public SqlConnection sqlconn = new SqlConnection();
    public string Error_Message;
    public List<SqlParameter> ParamList = new List<SqlParameter>();
    public ArrayList ParamValues = new ArrayList();

    public int SQLExecuteNonQueryValue;
    public clsData()
   

    public enum SQLAction
    {
        SelectAction,
        UpdateInsertDeleteAction
    }

    public virtual DataTable DataAction(clsData.SQLAction Action, DataTable dt, string cmdtext, string ParamValues = “”)
    {
        SQLExecuteNonQueryValue = -1;
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();
        cmd.CommandText = cmdtext;
        cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
        cmd.Connection = sqlconn;
        this.GetParameterList(cmdtext);
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(Error_Message)) {
            return null;
        }
        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(ParamValues)) {
            this.ParseSQLParameterValues(ParamValues);
            for (i = 0; i <= this.ParamList.Count – 1; i++) {
                cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(this.ParamList[i].ToString(), this.ParamValues[i].ToString());
            }
        }
        //Debug.WriteLine(cmd.CommandText)
        try {
            cmd.Connection.Open();
            switch (Action) {
                case SQLAction.SelectAction:
                    dt.Load(cmd.ExecuteReader());
                    break;
                case SQLAction.UpdateInsertDeleteAction:
                    //Check this value to make sure everything went ok
                    SQLExecuteNonQueryValue = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                    cmd.Connection.Close();
                    return null;
            }
            cmd.Connection.Close();

        } catch (Exception ex) {
            Error_Message = “There was a problem with ” + cmdtext + “. “;
            return null;
        }

        //removing duplicate table from dataset
        for (i = 0; i <= ds_Copy.Tables.Count – 1; i++) {
            if (ds_Copy.Tables(i).TableName == dt.TableName) {
                ds_Copy.Tables(i).Clear();
                ds_Copy.Tables(i).Columns.Clear();
            }
        }

        //placing datatable in the dataset
        ds_Copy.Merge(dt, false, MissingSchemaAction.Add);
        Error_Message = “”;
        return dt;
    }

    public DataTable DataActionTSQL(clsData.SQLAction Action, DataTable dt, string sqlstring)
    {
        SQLExecuteNonQueryValue = -1;
        SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand();
        cmd.CommandText = sqlstring;
        cmd.Connection = sqlconn;
        try {
            cmd.Connection.Open();
            switch (Action) {
                case SQLAction.SelectAction:
                    dt.Load(cmd.ExecuteReader());
                    break;
                case SQLAction.UpdateInsertDeleteAction:
                    //Check this value to make sure everything went ok
                    SQLExecuteNonQueryValue = cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
                    cmd.Connection.Close();
                    return null;
            }
            cmd.Connection.Close();

        } catch (Exception ex) {
            Error_Message = “There was a problem with ” + sqlstring + “. “;
            return null;
        }
        //removing duplicate table from dataset
        for (i = 0; i <= ds_Copy.Tables.Count – 1; i++) {
            if (ds_Copy.Tables(i).TableName == dt.TableName) {
                ds_Copy.Tables(i).Clear();
                ds_Copy.Tables(i).Columns.Clear();
            }
        }
        //placing datatable in the dataset
        ds_Copy.Merge(dt, false, MissingSchemaAction.Add);
        Error_Message = “”;
        return dt;
    }

    private List<SqlParameter> GetParameterList(string ProcName)
    {
        //Get the parameters for the selected stored procedure
        List<SqlParameter> inputParamList = new List<SqlParameter>();
        ParamList.Clear();

        using (SqlConnection cn = new SqlConnection()) {
            DispatcherTool.My.MySettings Settings = new DispatcherTool.My.MySettings();
            cn.ConnectionString = Settings.SRAConnectionString;
            SqlCommand myCommand = new SqlCommand();
            myCommand.Connection = cn;
            myCommand.CommandText = ProcName;
            myCommand.CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            try {
                cn.Open();
                SqlCommandBuilder.DeriveParameters(myCommand);
                cn.Close();
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                Error_Message = “There was a problem with the connection to the database.”;
                return null;
            }

            //Dim sqlparams As SqlParameterCollection = DirectCast(GetType(SqlParameterCollection).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.NonPublic Or BindingFlags.Instance, Nothing, Type.EmptyTypes, Nothing).Invoke(Nothing), SqlParameterCollection)

            foreach (SqlParameter param in myCommand.Parameters) {
                if (param.Direction == System.Data.ParameterDirection.Input || param.Direction == System.Data.ParameterDirection.InputOutput) {
                    //sqlparams.Add(param.ParameterName & ” – ” & param.SqlDbType.ToString())
                    //Debug.WriteLine(param.ParameterName & ” – ” & param.SqlDbType.ToString())
                    inputParamList.Add(param);
                    //Else
                    // sqlparams.Add(param.ParameterName & ” – ” & param.SqlDbType)
                    //Debug.WriteLine(param.ParameterName & ” -2 ” & param.SqlDbType)
                }
            }
        }
        this.ParamList = inputParamList;
        Error_Message = “”;
        return this.ParamList;
    }

    public void ParseSQLParameterValues(string ValueString)
    {
        ParamValues.Clear();
        string[] parts = ValueString.Split(new char[] { ‘,’ });
        string part = null;
        foreach (string part_loopVariable in parts) {
            part = part_loopVariable;
            ParamValues.Add(part);
        }
    }

    //’Public Shared Function ConvertToTypedDataTable(Of T As {Data.DataTable, New})(ByVal dtBase As Data.DataTable) As T
    //’    Dim dtTyped As New T
    //’    dtTyped.Merge(dtBase)
    //’    Return dtTyped
    //’End Function

}

And then it’s use…..

private void Button1_Click(System.Object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    Strongly_Typed_DataSet.usp_Your_Stored_Procedure dt = new Strongly_Typed_DataSet.usp_Your_Stored_Procedure();

    DataGridView1.DataSource = cn.DataAction(clsData.SQLAction.SelectAction, dt, ds.usp_Get_PrinterName_for_PickList_Printing.ToString, “Tubing”);

    //DataGridView1.DataSource = cn.DataActionTSQL(clsData.SQLAction.SelectAction, dt, “SELECT *FROM Your_Table”)

}


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Save Control Settings with vb.net

What’s this you say? A new blog entry? If you haven’t completely deserted me …. well I don’t know what’s wrong with you! Smile jk. But anyway here is the latest. I am working for a national hotel chain in Memphis, TN. I got married, moved to New Jersey and am we are now separated. Yes it is a long story and no I am not going to bore you with the details!

Before I go any further, I actually write very little in vb.net anymore. The language is awesome. It’s just that very few people want that skill set now and if you want to be employed you need to write in C#. It’s just the way it is. However in this particular task, I found vb.net to be the tool of choice here. The reason is there is no C# equivalent to VB’s implicit ‘once only’ variable initialization within loops. I am not sure why that is but that is the case here. This code snippet is ideal when you want to allow the end user to dictate how a given control is to look or operate. Yes in my example I am using an Infragistic control so if you copy and paste this do NOT email me complaining about broken references please! I hope you find the code useful and thank you for showing up! Smile

Public Shared Sub SaveControl(ByVal StateName As String, ByVal ParamArray Controls As Control())
        Dim section As String = “”
        Dim appName As String = StringType.FromObject(Interaction.IIf((StringType.StrCmp(Application.ProductName, “”, False) = 0), “VSDesigner”, Application.ProductName))
        Dim control As Control
        For Each control In Controls
            If (Not control.FindForm Is Nothing) Then
                Dim form As Form
                If (StringType.StrCmp((StateName & “”), “”, False) > 0) Then
                    section = String.Concat(New String() { control.FindForm.Name, “.”, control.Name, “.”, StateName })
                Else
                    section = (control.FindForm.Name & “.” & control.Name)
                End If
                If TypeOf control Is Form Then
                    form = DirectCast(control, Form)
                    If (form.WindowState = FormWindowState.Normal) Then
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, form.Name, “Top”, StringType.FromInteger(form.Top))
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, form.Name, “Left”, StringType.FromInteger(form.Left))
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, form.Name, “Height”, StringType.FromInteger(form.Height))
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, form.Name, “Width”, StringType.FromInteger(form.Width))
                    End If
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, form.Name, “WindowState”, StringType.FromInteger(CInt(form.WindowState)))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is Splitter Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim splitter As Splitter = DirectCast(control, Splitter)
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “SplitPosition”, StringType.FromInteger(splitter.SplitPosition))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is FilterListView Then
                    Dim view2 As FilterListView = DirectCast(control, FilterListView)
                    form = view2.FindForm
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “View”, StringType.FromInteger(CInt(view2.ListView.View)))
                    Dim header As ColumnHeader
                    For Each header In view2.ListView.Columns
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, (“Column” & StringType.FromInteger(header.Index)), StringType.FromInteger(header.Width))
                    Next
                    Dim filter As FilterListViewFilter
                    For Each filter In view2.Filters
                        Dim tag As UserProfileSetting
                        If (filter.Tag Is Nothing) Then
                            tag = Context.User.Settings.NewItem
                            Dim setting2 As UserProfileSetting = tag
                            setting2.Type = UserProfileSettingTypeEnum.FilterListView
                            setting2.Name = section
                            setting2.Description = filter.Name
                            setting2.Value = filter.Filter
                            setting2 = Nothing
                            filter.Tag = tag
                        ElseIf filter.Deleted Then
                            tag = DirectCast(filter.Tag, UserProfileSetting)
                            If Context.User.Settings.Contains(tag) Then
                                Context.User.Settings.Remove(tag)
                            End If
                        Else
                            tag = DirectCast(filter.Tag, UserProfileSetting)
                            tag.Value = filter.Filter
                        End If
                    Next
                    Context.User.Settings.Save
                ElseIf (TypeOf control Is ListView Or TypeOf control Is SortListView) Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim view As ListView = DirectCast(control, ListView)
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “View”, StringType.FromInteger(CInt(view.View)))
                    Dim header As ColumnHeader
                    For Each header In view.Columns
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, (“Column” & StringType.FromInteger(header.Index)), StringType.FromInteger(header.Width))
                    Next
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is TabControl Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim control2 As TabControl = DirectCast(control, TabControl)
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “View”, StringType.FromInteger(control2.SelectedIndex))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is TextBox Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim box3 As TextBox = DirectCast(control, TextBox)
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “Text”, box3.Text)
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is ComboBox Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim box As ComboBox = DirectCast(control, ComboBox)
                    If (box.DropDownStyle = ComboBoxStyle.DropDown) Then
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “Text”, box.Text)
                    End If
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “SelectedIndex”, StringType.FromInteger(box.SelectedIndex))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is CheckBox Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim box2 As CheckBox = DirectCast(control, CheckBox)
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “Checked”, StringType.FromBoolean(box2.Checked))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is DataGrid Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim grid As DataGrid = DirectCast(control, DataGrid)
                    Dim num As Integer = 0
                    Dim style As DataGridTableStyle
                    For Each style In grid.TableStyles
                        Dim num2 As Integer = 0
                        Dim style2 As DataGridColumnStyle
                        For Each style2 In style.GridColumnStyles
                            Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, (section & StringType.FromInteger(num) & “.” & StringType.FromInteger(num2)), “Width”, StringType.FromInteger(style2.Width))
                            num2 += 1
                        Next
                        num += 1
                    Next
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is KeyedDropDown Then
                    form = control.FindForm
                    Dim down As KeyedDropDown = DirectCast(control, KeyedDropDown)
                    If (down.DropDownStyle = ComboBoxStyle.DropDown) Then
                        Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “Text”, down.Text)
                    End If
                    Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, “SelectedIndex”, StringType.FromInteger(down.SelectedIndex))
                ElseIf TypeOf control Is UltraGrid Then
                    Dim grid2 As UltraGrid = DirectCast(control, UltraGrid)
                    Dim enumerator2 As BandEnumerator = grid2.DisplayLayout.Bands.GetEnumerator
                    Do While enumerator2.MoveNext
                        Dim current As UltraGridBand = enumerator2.Current
                        Dim enumerator As ColumnEnumerator = current.Columns.GetEnumerator
                        Do While enumerator.MoveNext
                            Dim column As UltraGridColumn = enumerator.Current
                            Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, (“Hidden.” & StringType.FromInteger(current.Index) & “.” & column.Key), StringType.FromBoolean(column.Hidden))
                            Interaction.SaveSetting(appName, section, (“Width.” & StringType.FromInteger(current.Index) & “.” & column.Key), StringType.FromInteger(column.Width))
                        Loop
                    Loop
                End If
            End If
        Next
    End Sub

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How to make Linq and IList sort Dynamically using C#

I apologize that it has been a while. I have been extremely busy and in the time that I have been away I went through treatment for a medical issue. Needless to say I had other issues to deal with other than this blog. But I will try to publish more frequently. Today’s topic was a question from another developer which was to have have a Linq and IList sort dynamically. So long as you don’t force execution by using ToList, you can keep tacking on to your query until you are ready to actually run it. This is because much of LINQ uses “deferred execution”. For example, you could do something similar to:

var query = apps.AsQueryable()
.Select
(Application => new
{
ID = Application.ApplicationId,
Force = Application.Force.Description,
Function = Application.BusinessFunction.Description,
Category = Application.Category.Description,
SubCategory = Application.SubCategory.Description,
Name = Application.ApplicationName,
Description = Application.ApplicationDescription
}
).Take(10);

switch (sortType)
{
case “ID”:
query = query.Orderby(Application => Application.ApplicationId);
break;
case “Force”:
query = query.Orderby(Application => Application.Force);
break;
}

IList tempList = query.ToList();

As always it has been great getting your all feedback while I was gone. Thank You! Smile

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Class Set as DataContext in XAML without Code Behind

In dealing with a problem at work and I am probably as guilty as anyone of relying on code behind to do basic functions without soley using XAML. Why? Because that’s the way I have always done it. But it’s a new day and time to learn new ways to do things. So here we go….

This example shows a class set as datacontext – the code behind file is completely empty.

Have a great week….

 

<Window x:Class=”cSharpTest.MainWindow”
        xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation”
        xmlns:x=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml”
        xmlns:vm=”clr-namespace:cSharpTest”
        Title=”MainWindow” Height=”350″ Width=”525″>
    <Window.Resources>
        <vm:MyData x:Key=”ViewModel”/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext=”{StaticResource ViewModel}”>
        <ListBox Name=”MyListBox” ItemsSource=”{Binding Primes}”/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace cSharpTest
{
    class MyData
    {
        public MyData()
        {
            _primes = new int[5] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 11 };
        }
        private int[] _primes;
        public  int[] Primes
        {
            get { return this._primes; }
         }
    }
}

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter Three

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on chapter three. Chapter three picks up where chapter two left off  in describing the Visual Studio environment. It does an excellent job of reviewing the more intricate details of Visual Studio. Again, it ignores winforms and focuses on the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) forms and design editor. Encouraging the reader to customize the interface for themselves, it shows how to do that. I certainly have not seen that done before so early on in the process and in such an easygoing manner. It ends the first section explaining what Intellisense is. Later on in this chapter it goes into how members are listed. An excellent tutorial on refactoring and such is also discussed. It’s possible this discussion could have waited a bit until later on but it still works here.

We then move on to cover what a Visual Studio solution and project is and what it contains including a very helpful diagram, as they seem to always do in this book, explaining what the relationship between the various items in a Visual Studio solution and project are.

image

The next section introduces designer and source files, resources and your design documents. Covering how to add items to a solution or project comes next along with a graphical and step by step process of how to modify project properties. Changing the icon and window property is one such example they cover. Then we build the application to see the results of the changes.

Further customization of the Visual Studio environment is then discussed in the usual graphical and step by step nature this book is so good at.

image

Overall I wish I had had a book like this when I first started using Visual Studio so many eons ago!

The next chapter gets into debugging and deploying an application. Moving right along the user shouldn’t be overwhelmed with this patient, easy going manner of teaching.

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter Two

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on Chapter Two. Chapter Two gets into some of the nuts and bolts of the .NET Framework and writes the initial “Hello World” application that these beginner books almost always do. They begin by putting up a very nice illustration of how .NET works. Truly I have not seen it explained in such a way before!

image

They give you a little quiz on what you picked up.

Then there is an explanation of why the .NET Framework is a better way to go than say a Visual Basic 6 way of thinking. I am not sure that to a beginner programmer they understand or need to know any of this. But they certainly make good points. Being an old VB6 and VBA programmer myself I certainly could appreciate what was said.

Then they proceed into building the first application. But there is a little twist. Riordan chooses to not even bother with winforms and instead chooses to plow right into a Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) application. At first the choice seemed odd to me. But as I considered it this makes sense. WPF is the future. Winforms is dying. It’s a sad truth but it is what it is.

Riordan walks you through the process of creating a WPF application in Visual Studio 2010 while beautifully illustrating how to do that task.

image

Then the first example of modifying a property in the WPF gui is introduced. Really it is quite well done. The appropriate message box appears saying “hello world!” is displayed. She tells the user to take a break and congratulates them on their first application. She then displays and explains the code editor in the same easy going manner. Another note that often goes on through out this book she often gives the novice programmer fun little facts to digest, so as to have fun while learning. Imagine that! C# learning being made fun!

We will be covering Chapter Three in the next entry where the Visual Studio interface will be reviewed in more detail.

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter One

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on Chapter One. Chapter One opens with an introduction to what application development is. It takes the reader through the simple problem of a messy paper stack and through a picture flow chart attempts to show the reader how the problem is to be solved and equate it with the same process of writing a windows application. It is unlike anything you have ever seen in a development book! But it is also one of the most clear renderings of the application process that I have seen.

image

They introduce you to the “clients” that are to appear throughout the book, two cooks named Neil and Gordon. (Incidentally the editor happens to be named Neil….coincidence? I think not!). It encourages you to take breaks at certain strategic points throughout the book as well. Neil and Gordon hand out their requirements and Riordan helps you get through it. She even begins the process of explaining the Agile software development methodology. It then introduces UML (Unified Modeling Language) and why it should be used. That and Agile are actually advanced topics perhaps left to a later time but I get why they do it here.

In the first project the book attempts to take you down the path of creating your requirements but before you see a single line of code you see the requirements explained in an easy to understand real life example. Then before you know it you have been introduced to database schemas, class diagrams and screen layout concepts all really done in a beautifully illustrated way. Extremely well done!

When there are words that need to be defined they are set out like so, so that they stand out from the rest of the page (see example below). Again hard to miss and it really catches the eye.

image

It goes into JIT (Just in Time Debugging) and the CLR (common language runtime) explaining what it is and how it is used. Of course at the end there is the obligatory review of the chapter. The only difference is this one is beautifully illustrated.

I don’t know about you but I am certainly looking forward to chapter two as we get more into the nuts and bolts of what is happening.

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