Posts Tagged resources

Class Set as DataContext in XAML without Code Behind

In dealing with a problem at work and I am probably as guilty as anyone of relying on code behind to do basic functions without soley using XAML. Why? Because that’s the way I have always done it. But it’s a new day and time to learn new ways to do things. So here we go….

This example shows a class set as datacontext – the code behind file is completely empty.

Have a great week….

 

<Window x:Class=”cSharpTest.MainWindow”
        xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation”
        xmlns:x=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml”
        xmlns:vm=”clr-namespace:cSharpTest”
        Title=”MainWindow” Height=”350″ Width=”525″>
    <Window.Resources>
        <vm:MyData x:Key=”ViewModel”/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext=”{StaticResource ViewModel}”>
        <ListBox Name=”MyListBox” ItemsSource=”{Binding Primes}”/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace cSharpTest
{
    class MyData
    {
        public MyData()
        {
            _primes = new int[5] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 11 };
        }
        private int[] _primes;
        public  int[] Primes
        {
            get { return this._primes; }
         }
    }
}

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter Three

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on chapter three. Chapter three picks up where chapter two left off  in describing the Visual Studio environment. It does an excellent job of reviewing the more intricate details of Visual Studio. Again, it ignores winforms and focuses on the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) forms and design editor. Encouraging the reader to customize the interface for themselves, it shows how to do that. I certainly have not seen that done before so early on in the process and in such an easygoing manner. It ends the first section explaining what Intellisense is. Later on in this chapter it goes into how members are listed. An excellent tutorial on refactoring and such is also discussed. It’s possible this discussion could have waited a bit until later on but it still works here.

We then move on to cover what a Visual Studio solution and project is and what it contains including a very helpful diagram, as they seem to always do in this book, explaining what the relationship between the various items in a Visual Studio solution and project are.

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The next section introduces designer and source files, resources and your design documents. Covering how to add items to a solution or project comes next along with a graphical and step by step process of how to modify project properties. Changing the icon and window property is one such example they cover. Then we build the application to see the results of the changes.

Further customization of the Visual Studio environment is then discussed in the usual graphical and step by step nature this book is so good at.

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Overall I wish I had had a book like this when I first started using Visual Studio so many eons ago!

The next chapter gets into debugging and deploying an application. Moving right along the user shouldn’t be overwhelmed with this patient, easy going manner of teaching.

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Tag Generator for Live Writer: Problems and Workarounds

One topic of emails and questions I receive are in relation to the Tag Generator, a plugin available for download, for Live Writer, a blog writing tool.

First some history. The Tag Generator was originally written over two years ago to provide myself a way to automatically generate tags for my blog posts. I got tired of doing it manually. It worked well for me so I decided to create a plugin that others could use. It uses the Microsoft Word thesaurus to verify words in the blog and their meanings. It isn’t perfect but its better than nothing. Obviously some of you agreed as over 14,000 downloads took place. However over the last couple of years, for various reasons, no work was done on this plugin and a new version of Live Writer was released. While the Tag Generator plugin still works, it does not support the options feature for plugins that came out with this version of Live Writer. In addition, as you all know, Windows Live Spaces no longer supports blogging, instead choosing to support the Word Press blogging resources. Generating these tags are obviously pointless.

You might wonder to yourself why I just don’t sit down and rewrite the plugin and be done with it. Basically it is because I am too busy at the moment to do so. I will at some point I promise. I apologize to those of you who have been frustrated. But this blog post today is to tell you how I still make use of this plugin and how  you can too.

First after you are done writing your post, right click on your document and click select all.

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Then click “Insert” in the Live Writer toolbar and click “Generate Tags”.

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Click the option or options you wish to generate the tags for and click the button “Generate”

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Add, modify or delete the tags you wish…..but do not click the Insert button at the bottom! Instead select all of the words in the “Tags” text box and copy them. Then in the Set tags text box at the top of Live Writer, paste these words in their textbox.

image

Now your post will be tag ready for publication whenever you choose!

I am sorry for the hassle. I still find this plugin extremely useful for me and I promise I will get around to redoing it for you at some point. But this works fine for me for now and hopefully will for you as well.

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