Posts Tagged schemas

Class Set as DataContext in XAML without Code Behind

In dealing with a problem at work and I am probably as guilty as anyone of relying on code behind to do basic functions without soley using XAML. Why? Because that’s the way I have always done it. But it’s a new day and time to learn new ways to do things. So here we go….

This example shows a class set as datacontext – the code behind file is completely empty.

Have a great week….

 

<Window x:Class=”cSharpTest.MainWindow”
        xmlns=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation”
        xmlns:x=”http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml”
        xmlns:vm=”clr-namespace:cSharpTest”
        Title=”MainWindow” Height=”350″ Width=”525″>
    <Window.Resources>
        <vm:MyData x:Key=”ViewModel”/>
    </Window.Resources>
    <Grid DataContext=”{StaticResource ViewModel}”>
        <ListBox Name=”MyListBox” ItemsSource=”{Binding Primes}”/>
    </Grid>
</Window>

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace cSharpTest
{
    class MyData
    {
        public MyData()
        {
            _primes = new int[5] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 11 };
        }
        private int[] _primes;
        public  int[] Primes
        {
            get { return this._primes; }
         }
    }
}

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C# Application linked to SharePoint List Web Service

This weekend found myself knee deep in a crisis that my friend who had migrated from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 (there were reasons he couldn’t go to 2010). Simply put the migration from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 had broken his application (tracking program that submitted data to a 2003 SharePoint List) because in SharePoint 2007  you can’t do this while not on the actual server if you have “Web Page Security Validation” enabled. So for the code below you have to have SPWeb.AllowUnsafeUpdates = true; . Obviously not the ideal solution for my friend but we didn’t have time to screw around. Here is what I did….

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Collections;
using System.Xml;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Net;
 
namespace Trigger_Tracker
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {//form move on click and drag
        bool FormMoving;
        Point initialPoint;
        TriggerTrackerPictureBox frmPicture;
 
        public Form1()
        {//form move on click and drag
            InitializeComponent();
            comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0;
            FormMoving = false;
 
            frmPicture = new TriggerTrackerPictureBox();
            frmPicture.localForm = this;
            frmPicture.Owner = this;
            frmPicture.Show();
            frmPicture.Width = 68;
            frmPicture.Height = 65;
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        private void SetPositionOfPictureForm()
        {
            frmPicture.Top = this.Top + 26;
            frmPicture.Left = this.Left + 87;
        }
 
       
 
        private void TrackerButton(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string listGUID = “A93E1A7E-67D0-4D7D-A4ED-803D7DFE684B”;
            string viewGUID = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
            //string viewGUID2 = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
 
            int ItemCounter = 1;
            ServiceList.Lists listService = new ServiceList.Lists();
           // RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient listService = new RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient();
 
            //////
           listService.Credentials = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
           //listService.ChannelFactory.Credentials.Windows.ClientCredential   = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
 
            XmlNode activeItemData = listService.GetListItems(listGUID, viewGUID, null, null, “100”, null);
            XmlDocument xDoc = new XmlDocument();
            string tmpString = activeItemData.InnerXml.Replace(“\r\r”, “”);
            xDoc.LoadXml(tmpString);
            XmlNamespaceManager nsManager = new XmlNamespaceManager(xDoc.NameTable);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“z”, “#RowsetSchema”);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“rs”, “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:rowset”);
 
            XmlNodeList xNode = xDoc.SelectNodes(“/rs:data/z:row”, nsManager);
 
            foreach (XmlNode tmpNode in xNode)
                ItemCounter++;
 
            StringBuilder strBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            strBuilder.Append(“<Method ID='” + ItemCounter + “‘ Cmd=’New’>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Attachments’>” + “0” + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Title’>” + PolicyNumber.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Reason’>” + comboBox1.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“</Method>”);
 
            string strBatch = strBuilder.ToString();
 
            XmlDocument newDoc = new XmlDocument();
            XmlElement newElement = newDoc.CreateElement(“Batch”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“OnError”, “Continue”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“ViewName”, viewGUID);
            newElement.InnerXml = strBatch;
           
            XmlNode returnNode = listService.UpdateListItems(listGUID, newElement);
 
            this.comboBox1.Text = “Please Select….”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Text = “”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Mask = “0000000000”;
 
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
 
       
 
 
        public void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            if (FormMoving)
            {
                if ((Left + e.X – initialPoint.X) <= 0)
                    Left = 0;
                else if ((Right + e.X – initialPoint.X) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right)
                    Left = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right – Width;
                else
                    Left = Left + e.X – initialPoint.X;
                if ((Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) <= 0)
                    Top = 0;
                else if ((Bottom + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom)
                    Top = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom – Height;
                else
                    Top = Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y;
            }
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
       
 
        public void Form1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if(!PolicyNumber.Focused)
                this.Opacity = .25;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseHover_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
    }
}

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter One

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on Chapter One. Chapter One opens with an introduction to what application development is. It takes the reader through the simple problem of a messy paper stack and through a picture flow chart attempts to show the reader how the problem is to be solved and equate it with the same process of writing a windows application. It is unlike anything you have ever seen in a development book! But it is also one of the most clear renderings of the application process that I have seen.

image

They introduce you to the “clients” that are to appear throughout the book, two cooks named Neil and Gordon. (Incidentally the editor happens to be named Neil….coincidence? I think not!). It encourages you to take breaks at certain strategic points throughout the book as well. Neil and Gordon hand out their requirements and Riordan helps you get through it. She even begins the process of explaining the Agile software development methodology. It then introduces UML (Unified Modeling Language) and why it should be used. That and Agile are actually advanced topics perhaps left to a later time but I get why they do it here.

In the first project the book attempts to take you down the path of creating your requirements but before you see a single line of code you see the requirements explained in an easy to understand real life example. Then before you know it you have been introduced to database schemas, class diagrams and screen layout concepts all really done in a beautifully illustrated way. Extremely well done!

When there are words that need to be defined they are set out like so, so that they stand out from the rest of the page (see example below). Again hard to miss and it really catches the eye.

image

It goes into JIT (Just in Time Debugging) and the CLR (common language runtime) explaining what it is and how it is used. Of course at the end there is the obligatory review of the chapter. The only difference is this one is beautifully illustrated.

I don’t know about you but I am certainly looking forward to chapter two as we get more into the nuts and bolts of what is happening.

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