Posts Tagged solution

WCF and Email Attachments

First off I want to apologize for being away so long. It has been a crazy ride to say the least.

So a colleague of mine ran into an issue with WCF and emailing attachments and asked for help. In this block of code below it would always fail at:

Attachment attachment = new Attachment(fileAttachment.ContentStream, fileAttachment.Name);”     The error is : “Value cannot be null.
Parameter name: stream”

 

 

 
EmailSendInput emailSendInput = new EmailSendInput
                {
                    Attachments = new List<Attachment>(),
                    Body = model.Body,
                    To = new List<string> { model.EmailTo },
                    From = model.EmailFrom,
                    Subject = model.EmailSubject
                };

                if (model.Files != null)
                {
                    foreach (var currAttachment in model.Files)
                    {
                        if (currAttachment != null && currAttachment.ContentLength > 0)
                        {
                            // the filename needs to be nice looking
                            string fileName =
                                currAttachment.FileName.Substring(
                                    currAttachment.FileName.LastIndexOf(@”\”, System.StringComparison.Ordinal) + 1,
                                    currAttachment.FileName.Length
                                    – currAttachment.FileName.LastIndexOf(@”\”, System.StringComparison.Ordinal) – 1);

                            var attachment = new Attachment(currAttachment.InputStream, fileName);
                            emailSendInput.Attachments.Add(attachment);
                        }
                    }
                }

                B2BMortgageDataServiceAgent b2BMortgageDataServiceAgent = new B2BMortgageDataServiceAgent();
                EmailSendResponse emailSendResponse = b2BMortgageDataServiceAgent.SendEmail(emailSendInput);
                if (!emailSendResponse.Success)
                {
                    throw new Exception(emailSendResponse.Message);
                }
            }

public EmailSendResponse SendEmail(EmailSendInput input)
        {
            EmailSendResponse retVal = new EmailSendResponse();
            try
            {
               
                string smtpServer = “”
                string smtpPort = “”

                using (var client = new SmtpClient(smtpServer, Convert.ToInt32(smtpPort)))
                {
                    var mail = new MailMessage
                    {
                        From = new MailAddress(input.From),
                        Subject = input.Subject,
                        Body = input.Body
                    };
                    input.To.ForEach(t => mail.To.Add(t));

                    if (input.Attachments != null && input.Attachments.Count > 0)
                    {
                        foreach (var fileAttachment in input.Attachments)
                        {
                            //Code Crashes here
                            Attachment attachment = new Attachment(fileAttachment.ContentStream, fileAttachment.Name);
                            mail.Attachments.Add(attachment);
                        }
                    }

                    client.Send(mail);
                }

                retVal.Success = true;
            }
            catch (Exception exception)
            {
                retVal.Success = false;
                LogUtil.LogException(exception);

            
                retVal.Message = exception.ToString();
            }

            return retVal;
        }

and then the contract:

[DataContract]
    public class EmailSendInput
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string From { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public List<string> To { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string Subject { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string Body { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public List<Attachment> Attachments { get; set; }

    }

Implemented as:

public EmailSendResponse SendEmail(EmailSendInput input)
         {
             try
             {
                 return this.dataAgent.SendEmail(input);
             }
             catch (Exception e)
             {
                 this.logger.LogException(e, 2);
                 throw new FaultException(“An error occured in SendEmail. Error details : ” + this.BuildMessage(e));
             } 
         }

and the Email response:

[DataContract]
    public class EmailSendResponse
    {
        [DataMember]
        public bool Success { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string Message { get; set; }
    }

So now we have the problem. I basically had to recreate his datamember for attachment in the contract EmailSendInput to a

public List<EmailEncodedAttachment> Attachments { get; set; }

and added a new contract called EmailEncodedAttachment and process how he was handling the attachment differently. I’ve also included the MVC controller calls in case it might help you as well.

 

SOLUTION:

[DataContract]
    public class EmailSendInput
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string From { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public List<string> To { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string Subject { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public string Body { get; set; }

        [DataMember]
        public List<EmailEncodedAttachment> Attachments { get; set; }

    }

 

[DataContract]
    public class EmailEncodedAttachment
    {
        [DataMember]
        public string Base64Attachment;

        [DataMember]
        public string Name;

        /// <summary>
        /// One of the System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames
        /// </summary>
        [DataMember]
        public string MediaType;
    }
}
                retVal.Message = exception.ToString();
            }

            return retVal;
        }

 

public EmailSendResponse SendEmail(EmailSendInput input)
        {
            EmailSendResponse retVal = new EmailSendResponse();
            try
            {
               
                string smtpServer = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings[“SmtpServer”] ?? “url”;
                string smtpPort = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings[“SmtpPort”] ?? “portnum”;

                using (var client = new SmtpClient(smtpServer, Convert.ToInt32(smtpPort)))
                {
                    var mail = new MailMessage
                    {
                        From = new MailAddress(input.From),
                        Subject = input.Subject,
                        Body = input.Body
                    };
                    input.To.ForEach(t => mail.To.Add(t));

                    if (input.Attachments != null && input.Attachments.Count > 0)
                    {
                        foreach (var fileAttachment in input.Attachments)
                        {
                            mail.Attachments.Add(this.CreateAttachment(fileAttachment));
                        }
                    }

                    client.Send(mail);
                }

                retVal.Success = true;
            }
            catch (Exception exception)
            {
                retVal.Success = false;
                LogUtil.LogException(exception);
             
                retVal.Message = exception.ToString();
            }

            return retVal;
        }

 

The MVC controller action calls the service like so:

EmailSendInput emailSendInput = new EmailSendInput
                {
                    Attachments = new List<EmailEncodedAttachment>(),
                    Body = model.Body,
                    To = new List<string> { model.EmailTo },
                    From = model.EmailFrom,
                    Subject = model.EmailSubject
                };

                if (model.Files != null)
                {
                    foreach (var file in model.Files)
                    {
                        if (file != null && file.ContentLength > 0)
                        {
                            // the filename needs to be nice looking
                            string prettyFileName =
                                file.FileName.Substring(
                                    file.FileName.LastIndexOf(@”\”, System.StringComparison.Ordinal) + 1,
                                    file.FileName.Length
                                    – file.FileName.LastIndexOf(@”\”, System.StringComparison.Ordinal) – 1);

                            var attachment = this.CreateAttachment(prettyFileName, file.InputStream);
                            emailSendInput.Attachments.Add(attachment);
                        }
                    }
                }

                B2BMortgageDataServiceAgent b2BMortgageDataServiceAgent = new B2BMortgageDataServiceAgent();
                EmailSendResponse emailSendResponse = b2BMortgageDataServiceAgent.SendEmail(emailSendInput);
                if (!emailSendResponse.Success)
                {
                    throw new Exception(emailSendResponse.Message);
                }

 

and finally the encoding method which makes this possible:

private EmailEncodedAttachment CreateAttachment(string fileName, Stream stream)
        {
            EmailEncodedAttachment att = new EmailEncodedAttachment
            {
                Name = fileName,
                MediaType = System.Net.Mime.MediaTypeNames.Text.Plain
            };

            byte[] buffer = new byte[stream.Length];
            stream.Read(buffer, 0, (int)stream.Length);
            att.Base64Attachment = Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);

            return att;
        }

 

There you have it folks. I hope you have a great Sunday!

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C# Application linked to SharePoint List Web Service

This weekend found myself knee deep in a crisis that my friend who had migrated from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 (there were reasons he couldn’t go to 2010). Simply put the migration from SharePoint 2003 to 2007 had broken his application (tracking program that submitted data to a 2003 SharePoint List) because in SharePoint 2007  you can’t do this while not on the actual server if you have “Web Page Security Validation” enabled. So for the code below you have to have SPWeb.AllowUnsafeUpdates = true; . Obviously not the ideal solution for my friend but we didn’t have time to screw around. Here is what I did….

 

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Data;
using System.Drawing;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Windows.Forms;
using System.Collections;
using System.Xml;
using System.ServiceModel;
using System.Net;
 
namespace Trigger_Tracker
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {//form move on click and drag
        bool FormMoving;
        Point initialPoint;
        TriggerTrackerPictureBox frmPicture;
 
        public Form1()
        {//form move on click and drag
            InitializeComponent();
            comboBox1.SelectedIndex = 0;
            FormMoving = false;
 
            frmPicture = new TriggerTrackerPictureBox();
            frmPicture.localForm = this;
            frmPicture.Owner = this;
            frmPicture.Show();
            frmPicture.Width = 68;
            frmPicture.Height = 65;
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        private void SetPositionOfPictureForm()
        {
            frmPicture.Top = this.Top + 26;
            frmPicture.Left = this.Left + 87;
        }
 
       
 
        private void TrackerButton(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            string listGUID = “A93E1A7E-67D0-4D7D-A4ED-803D7DFE684B”;
            string viewGUID = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
            //string viewGUID2 = “6B2F3EF2-4B0C-41E1-B87E-0C3185B587DD”;
 
            int ItemCounter = 1;
            ServiceList.Lists listService = new ServiceList.Lists();
           // RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient listService = new RetentionLists.ListsSoapClient();
 
            //////
           listService.Credentials = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
           //listService.ChannelFactory.Credentials.Windows.ClientCredential   = System.Net.CredentialCache.DefaultNetworkCredentials;
 
            XmlNode activeItemData = listService.GetListItems(listGUID, viewGUID, null, null, “100”, null);
            XmlDocument xDoc = new XmlDocument();
            string tmpString = activeItemData.InnerXml.Replace(“\r\r”, “”);
            xDoc.LoadXml(tmpString);
            XmlNamespaceManager nsManager = new XmlNamespaceManager(xDoc.NameTable);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“z”, “#RowsetSchema”);
            nsManager.AddNamespace(“rs”, “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:rowset”);
 
            XmlNodeList xNode = xDoc.SelectNodes(“/rs:data/z:row”, nsManager);
 
            foreach (XmlNode tmpNode in xNode)
                ItemCounter++;
 
            StringBuilder strBuilder = new StringBuilder();
            strBuilder.Append(“<Method ID='” + ItemCounter + “‘ Cmd=’New’>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Attachments’>” + “0” + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Title’>” + PolicyNumber.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“<Field Name=’Reason’>” + comboBox1.Text + “</Field>”);
            strBuilder.Append(“</Method>”);
 
            string strBatch = strBuilder.ToString();
 
            XmlDocument newDoc = new XmlDocument();
            XmlElement newElement = newDoc.CreateElement(“Batch”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“OnError”, “Continue”);
            newElement.SetAttribute(“ViewName”, viewGUID);
            newElement.InnerXml = strBatch;
           
            XmlNode returnNode = listService.UpdateListItems(listGUID, newElement);
 
            this.comboBox1.Text = “Please Select….”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Text = “”;
            this.PolicyNumber.Mask = “0000000000”;
 
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
 
       
 
 
        public void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            if (FormMoving)
            {
                if ((Left + e.X – initialPoint.X) <= 0)
                    Left = 0;
                else if ((Right + e.X – initialPoint.X) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right)
                    Left = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Right – Width;
                else
                    Left = Left + e.X – initialPoint.X;
                if ((Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) <= 0)
                    Top = 0;
                else if ((Bottom + e.Y – initialPoint.Y) >= Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom)
                    Top = Screen.PrimaryScreen.Bounds.Bottom – Height;
                else
                    Top = Top + e.Y – initialPoint.Y;
            }
            SetPositionOfPictureForm();
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {//form move on click and drag
            FormMoving = true;
            initialPoint = new Point(e.X, e.Y);
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        private void pictureBox1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
        public void label1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            FormMoving = false;
        }
 
       
 
        public void Form1_MouseHover(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            if(!PolicyNumber.Focused)
                this.Opacity = .25;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseLeave(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void pictureBox1_MouseHover_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            this.Opacity = 1;
        }
 
        public void Form1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            comboBox1.Focus();
        }
    }
}

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Fluent C# Review : Chapter Three

I am reviewing an advanced copy of the book Fluent C# by noted .NET author Rebecca Riordan.

My focus today will be on chapter three. Chapter three picks up where chapter two left off  in describing the Visual Studio environment. It does an excellent job of reviewing the more intricate details of Visual Studio. Again, it ignores winforms and focuses on the Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) forms and design editor. Encouraging the reader to customize the interface for themselves, it shows how to do that. I certainly have not seen that done before so early on in the process and in such an easygoing manner. It ends the first section explaining what Intellisense is. Later on in this chapter it goes into how members are listed. An excellent tutorial on refactoring and such is also discussed. It’s possible this discussion could have waited a bit until later on but it still works here.

We then move on to cover what a Visual Studio solution and project is and what it contains including a very helpful diagram, as they seem to always do in this book, explaining what the relationship between the various items in a Visual Studio solution and project are.

image

The next section introduces designer and source files, resources and your design documents. Covering how to add items to a solution or project comes next along with a graphical and step by step process of how to modify project properties. Changing the icon and window property is one such example they cover. Then we build the application to see the results of the changes.

Further customization of the Visual Studio environment is then discussed in the usual graphical and step by step nature this book is so good at.

image

Overall I wish I had had a book like this when I first started using Visual Studio so many eons ago!

The next chapter gets into debugging and deploying an application. Moving right along the user shouldn’t be overwhelmed with this patient, easy going manner of teaching.

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